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Husbandry and Basic Care General stuff about keeping and maintaining cornsnakes in captivity.

Humidity
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Old 06-23-2019, 08:47 AM   #1
knox
Humidity

Just some thoughts on Humidity.

A quick Google search just showed care sheets that say to keep your Corn enclosure between anywhere from 40-60% humidity on one site to 50-70% humidity on another - and others in between those numbers.

Anyone who lives in Tennessee can attest that most of our AVERAGE humidity consists of 70%-80%, reaching peak humidity in the low 90% range. South GA, AL, and nearly all of Florida are much worse.

Granted, this isn't 24 hours a day. It can start off in the 50%, rise to 85%, and settle at 70% by evening; only to start the cycle again. However, during a rainy week you can expect 90-100% humidity constantly for weeks on end.

Not only Corns, but our Black Kings, Black Racers, Rats, Timbers, Copperheads, Ringnecks, DeKay, etc... All live in these conditions.

Bottom line - don't worry too much about perfect humidity for your Corn. If there is a problem with shedding, they might need a moist hide. But don't keep them in a tropical, dripping wet enclosure, either.

40%-70% - I personally believe anywhere in this range is fine. I have heard of respiratory problems with too high humidity, but have not yet heard what the cut off range is for those problems. If there are water droplets on the walls, it IS time to dry things out a bit.

Maybe our high humidity is why we see snakes sunning themselves so often- not only for heat but drying out some with our insane humidity. This is also why I personally like an overhead heat lamp either in conjunction with belly heat or even stand alone heat source. Our snakes do seem to enjoy basking - contrary to popular opinion.


I welcome any feedback, observations, and contestation. Enjoy those Corns!

For the record, it is currently cloudy, 71 degrees F, and 90% humid in Knoxville, TN. The next few days will be like a tropical rain forest. And I am sure our snakes will be just fine.
 
Old 06-23-2019, 11:59 AM   #2
JustinOfCO
Humidity is my biggest concern in keeping a snake. Temperature I can deal with, I've kept aquariums and the like with specific temperature requirements and understand using a thermostat, etc. But humidity, that's one that stumps me. Colorado is usually really dry (though lately we've had a monsoon, lots of rain the last couple days and even snow at higher elevations) and I am constantly afraid of it not being humid enough in my corn's enclosure when I get it set up.
 
Old 06-23-2019, 01:12 PM   #3
knox
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustinOfCO View Post
Humidity is my biggest concern in keeping a snake. Temperature I can deal with, I've kept aquariums and the like with specific temperature requirements and understand using a thermostat, etc. But humidity, that's one that stumps me. Colorado is usually really dry (though lately we've had a monsoon, lots of rain the last couple days and even snow at higher elevations) and I am constantly afraid of it not being humid enough in my corn's enclosure when I get it set up.
But perfect for my other favorite snake- The Gopher :-D
 
Old 06-23-2019, 04:38 PM   #4
JustinOfCO
Ha! Maybe I should get a gopher snake, then. They are related to corns, aren't they? What is their temperament like?

(Don't worry, still going to get a corn snake most likely!)
 
Old 06-23-2019, 04:52 PM   #5
Rich Z
I remember an issue I had once concerning humidity that might be worth mentioning.

This was in reference to a blotched king, and not a corn.

Anyway, I had this blotched king that seemed to be having trouble shedding. Skin seemed kind of krinkely and too tight with noticeable wrinkles. And the feed card didn't indicate any shed taking place recently. So the logical thing to do seemed to be to increase the humidity within the cage. Right? This was a large plastic sweater box, btw, with just 1/8th inch holes drilled into the lid. So the snake eventually goes opaque, clears up, but still no shed skin. And he isn't looking so good by now. Hmm... So on a wild guess, I got out a hole saw and drilled some 3 inch holes in each side of the box, and covered that with hardware cloth to really open up the air flow. I figured if more humidity wasn't helping, how about going in the opposite direction?

Snake goes opaque again soon after that, clears up, and when I found him in the process of shedding his skin and seeming to be struggling, I took him out and helped him along. He definitely wanted to be out of that old skin. No eyecaps and the tip of the tail skin came off cleanly. But I will tell you, that shed skin felt really thick. Almost like a thick wax paper. Snake looked just fine after that, almost like brand new, and no more problems in that cage afterwards.

As to why the snake was having trouble shedding because of too much humidity, I haven't any answer to offer.

So sometimes what seems logical in the way of resolving a critter's negative reaction to the humidity level might not be the remedy actually needed. And sometimes you have to do the complete opposite of what seems logical and sensible.
 
Old 06-23-2019, 05:35 PM   #6
knox
Thanks for that, Rich! Can’t argue with experience.
 

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