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The Cultivars (morphs)/Genetics Issues Discussions about genetics issues and/or the various cultivars for cornsnakes commercially available.

Questioning the strawberry gene
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Old 12-31-2012, 06:54 PM   #1
snakepunk
Questioning the strawberry gene

I'm probably going to aggravate half of the members here and confuse the rest, but I have sincere doubts about our current understanding of the strawberry gene and its mode of inheritance. What's even more, I think it is directly tied into the red-factor discussion.

Although it is wildly believed that strawberry is an allele to Hypo-A, I'm starting to question that teaching. Some of this is due to my own breedings, but after talking to Don S. about it, I feel even more confident in this assertion.

It seems to me that at least some "strawberries" are just hypo-A's. It's no secret that known examples of this morph can greatly vary. Some like Serpenco's "scarlet" line (do any of these still exist?) were quite red, while other hypos can resemble normal/classic corns at maturity.

I do think that most strawberrys however, are what many of us have been referring to as "red-factor" corns. This gene/genes appears to act in a dominate manner, with the more red (or pink in the case of the salmon snows/ghost) being the super forms.

Although I do need to conduct several more test to prove this theory, as well as have those same test replicated by others independently, I think this particular model better fits the results I've been getting (and seeing in others) so far.
 
Old 12-31-2012, 07:00 PM   #2
Carpe Serpentis
Wink

Questions are good! Testing is even better. I wish you well with this endeavor. I am definitely turned on by some of the strawberries I have seen. Being new to corns, I often wonder how the snakes color changes as the snake matures as something that looks stunning as a baby maybe not so much as an adult. Thanks for sharing for us newbies.
 
Old 12-31-2012, 07:10 PM   #3
exar15xe
Just curious how many test breeding have you done with these genes (how many generations out are you with them) and how are you telling a difference? Are you looking at them microscopically or just what you see. Coming from the scientist in me you should have indisputable quantities of test done before before confusing people with a new theory. I agree there is some differences within some animals I have some myself that I question but I would do breeding through the f-2 before stating the results. Which you may have, hence my question?
 
Old 12-31-2012, 08:01 PM   #4
snakepunk
I have strawberrys from several different sources, including Jim Stelpflug (who originated strawberrys as well as the salmon snows/ghost), Chuck P., and others.

Looking at them under a microscope will only tell you what they look like under a microscope, not how the gene is inherited.

If strawberry IS a dominate gene, you only need one generation to prove it. Since I've hatched out (as have others) what appears to be strawberrys in the F1's, this seems to validate the claim.

Whether I confuse people or not seems to beg the question.
 
Old 12-31-2012, 08:12 PM   #5
BSLMichael
Quote:
Originally Posted by snakepunk View Post
I have strawberrys from several different sources, including Jim Stelpflug (who originated strawberrys as well as the salmon snows/ghost), Chuck P., and others.

Looking at them under a microscope will only tell you what they look like under a microscope, not how the gene is inherited.

If strawberry IS a dominate gene, you only need one generation to prove it. Since I've hatched out (as have others) what appears to be strawberrys in the F1's, this seems to validate the claim.

Whether I confuse people or not seems to beg the question.
Looking at them under a microscope will show differences in genes that are hard to tell apart other wise. I think that is what he was getting at.
 
Old 12-31-2012, 08:37 PM   #6
crotalis40741
I have stawberries and redfactors both here, and must say mine at least don't look alike. Some may call some hypo a's strawberries but I don't think it is the case. Strawberry x hypo will get you hypo/strawberry. I don't think it is a dominant gene either because there are het strawberry animals around.
Red factor was used to create the neon snow lines that Poppy Corns are famous for. But please keep us posted on your breeding trials, new information is always needed even if some of us have to eat crow. lol Pass me some salt if that turns out to be the case
 
Old 12-31-2012, 09:17 PM   #7
chris68
"I don't think it is a dominant gene either because there are het strawberry animals around"

But it does make you wonder

TS line stuff




Definitely het "hypo", all three and all are varying degree's of pink...
 
Old 12-31-2012, 09:43 PM   #8
Dale
I surrendered my search (genetically anyway) and settled for finding the best visual pinks I could find, breeding, and seeing what happens.
 
Old 12-31-2012, 10:34 PM   #9
crotalis40741
First pic up is a strawberry female I have here second is one of my redfactor babies, as you can see there is a big difference.
 
Old 12-31-2012, 10:43 PM   #10
Carpe Serpentis
Wow, that is beautiful! Crotalis that is one da
 

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