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General Chit-Chat Forum Discussion about general topics that are really off topic concerning corn snakes, or just about any old chit at all.

Scaleless Snakes: A brief history
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Old 10-05-2013, 01:51 PM   #1
RobbiesCornField
Scaleless Snakes: A brief history

Being one of the newer mutations in several different species throughout the hobby, this particular gene is causing quite a stink. People are calling them an "abomination" that could "never survive in the wild".

Scaleless snakes have been found in the wild as far back as 1942 when the first scaleless Western garter snake was captured. After that in 1971, a scaleless gopher snake was captured.


Photo source


Shortly after that, a scaleless mole snake was captured in 1978. Following that came an Eastern garter snake in 1982. The most important observation made by the scientists was that they were captured in varying stages of maturity (hatchling to adult), and none were noted to be any more scarred than "normal" snakes captured from the same area. In 1985, Dr. H. Bernard Bechtel obtained a pair of scaleless Texas rat snakes from the Bronx Zoo. In 1990, he proved out the gene as simple recessive. Another source

In the time that science has known of the scaleless mutation, multiple studies have been done to see if scaleless snakes dehydrate more quickly than their scaled kin. The short answer? No. No they do not.

Since then, the scaleless gene seems to be cropping up in many different species, especially those heavily propagated in captive breeding programs. Here are a few examples of some recently discovered scaleless specimens in a variety of species:

Ball pythons



Corns



Texas rat snakes



Gopher snakes



Death adders



Burmese pythons



Hognoses



Rattlesnakes






And many, many more.

In short, it has been proven that this gene is not lethal to the animal, and that wild specimens can survive, and even thrive. It is not an abomination, and is not something to stick your nose up at. You may not like them, and that's fine! No one is forcing you to. But before you bash something for being different, do a little research first. These are absolutely awesome little animals, and deserve the same respect that any other morph does.
 
Old 10-05-2013, 02:06 PM   #2
Nanci
Thanks, now I need a death adder.
 
Old 10-05-2013, 02:15 PM   #3
RobbiesCornField
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nanci View Post
Thanks, now I need a death adder.
I wonder how Rich would feel about that?
 
Old 10-05-2013, 02:53 PM   #4
HVani
I need a death adder! Not sure how that would fly with the hubby.
 
Old 10-05-2013, 02:56 PM   #5
RobbiesCornField
Y'all are crazy. I need a scaleless hoggie or twelve!
 
Old 10-05-2013, 03:00 PM   #6
hikisquid
The rattlesnake looks like it just curled up in a grocery bag. XD

I might need a death adder too, they look so goshdarn hilarious (oh the hilarious death that would occur I bet)
 
Old 10-05-2013, 03:09 PM   #7
Nanci
Quote:
Originally Posted by RobbiesCornField View Post
I wonder how Rich would feel about that?
Well, if you don't live with me, you don't get a vote...
 
Old 10-05-2013, 03:28 PM   #8
hypnoctopus
I did not realize this mutation was found in so many different species! Great write-up, Robbie!

Gonna go look at all the pictures again...
 
Old 10-05-2013, 03:45 PM   #9
RobbiesCornField
Quote:
Originally Posted by hikisquid View Post
The rattlesnake looks like it just curled up in a grocery bag. XD

I might need a death adder too, they look so goshdarn hilarious (oh the hilarious death that would occur I bet)
It would be the most adorable cause of death ever. "I was just going in to pinch his cute widdle scalewess face!"

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nanci View Post
Well, if you don't live with me, you don't get a vote...


Quote:
Originally Posted by hypnoctopus View Post
I did not realize this mutation was found in so many different species! Great write-up, Robbie!

Gonna go look at all the pictures again...
Thank you! And go do a Google search for some more pictures. The scaleless gopher snakes are particularly beautiful! And will probably be my next scaleless purchase, IF I can find some at a good price.
 
Old 10-05-2013, 05:58 PM   #10
Justine66
that scaleless hognose is UNBELIEVABLY. adorable!
his eye balls look huge!! almost alian like! :P

I'm inlove.
 

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